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Historic Art | Cornelius Krieghoff

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Going to Market c.1860

Technique: oil on canvas

Dimensions: 14 x 10 in.

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Cornelius Krieghoff’s Going to Market is a great example of his work and a theme he often illustrated; he painted habitant and indigenous women on their way to the market many times over. The details and setting changes between each work, but the narrative stays the same. He frequently chose to show Moccasin sellers such as in this work. Going to Market is similar to Moccasin Seller Crossing the St. Lawrence at Quebec City in the collection of National Gallery of Canada and Indian Woman, Moccasin Seller in the collection of Art Gallery of Ontario.

About the Artist

Krieghoff, Cornelius (1815 – 1872)

Cornelius Krieghoff was born in Amsterdam on June 19, 1815. During his childhood his family moved to Dusseldorf. In his early twenties Krieghoff moved with his brother to America. Once there, Krieghoff enlisted in the American Army and made many topographical studied during his service. He moved his young family to New York in 1842 where he opened a painting studio. As a young man Krieghoff had studied art and in 1844 he went back to Europe to continue these studies. 1845 brought him to Toronto where he opened another studio and in 1846 opened yet another in Montreal. Krieghoff was a founding member of the Montreal Society of Artists, which he exhibited extensively. He also exhibited along side Paul Kane at the Salon of the Toronto Society of Artists. In 1853 he moved to Quebec City and the popularity of his genre scenes exploded. Krieghoff’s most prolific period was between 1853 and 1863. After this time He again returned to Europe where he exhibited with Theophile Hamel at the Paris Exhibition of 1867. Krieghoff returned to North America only a short time before his death in 1872.

“Painting in Quebec 1820 – 1850” Musé du Quebec. 1992

“Early Painters and Engravers of Canada” J. Russell Harper. 1970


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